Give To Wrens

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

 Additional publications can be found at: Google Scholar

 

Bowers, E.K., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2017. Interactive effects of parental age on offspring fitness and age-assortative mating in a wild bird. Journal of Experimental Zoology 326A: in press.

 

Dorset, E.E., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2017. Behavioral plasticity in response to perceived predation risk in breeding house wrens. Evolutionary Biology 44: 227-239.

 

Bowers, E.K., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2017. Maternal natal environment and breeding territory predict the condition and sex ratio of offspring. Evolutionary Biology 44: 11-20.

 

Will, D.S., E.E. Dorset, C.F. Thompson, S.K. Sakaluk, and E.K. Bowers. 2017. Size of nest-cavity entrance influences male attractiveness and paternal provisioning in house wrens. Journal of Zoology 302: 1-7.

 

Bowers, E.K., J.L. Grindstaff, S.S. Soukup, N.E. Drilling, K.P. Eckerle, S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2016. Spring temperatures influence selection on breeding date and the potential for phenological mismatch in a migratory bird. Ecology 97: 2880-2891.

 

Strange, M.S., R.M. Bowden, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2016. Pre- and postnatal effects of corticosterone on fitness-related traits and the timing of endogenous corticosterone production in a songbird. Journal of Experimental Zoology 325A: 347-359.

 

Bowers, E.K., R.M. Bowden, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2016. Elevated corticosterone during egg production elicits increased maternal investment and promotes nestling growth in a wild bird. Hormones and Behavior 83: 6-13.

 

Bowers, E.K., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2016. No effect of blood sampling or phytohaemagglutinin injection on post-fledging survival in a wild songbird. Ecology and Evolution 6: 3107-3114.

 

Bowers, E.K., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2016. Within-female plasticity in sex allocation is associated with a behavioral polyphenism in house wrens. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 29: 602-616.

 

Bowers, E.K., A.M. Forsman, B.S. Masters, B.G.P. Johnson, L.S. Johnson, S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2015. Increased extra-pair paternity in broods of aging males and enhanced recruitment of extra-pair young in a migratory bird. Evolution 69: 2533-2541.

 

Hodges, C.J., E.K. Bowers, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2015. Cascading costs of reproduction in female house wrens induced to lay larger clutches. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 28: 1383-1393.

Bowers, E.K., A. White, A. Lang, L. Podgorski, C.F. Thompson, S.K. Sakaluk, W.B. Jaeckle, and R.G. Harper. 2015. Eggshell porosity covaries with egg size among female house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) but is unrelated to incubation onset and egg-laying order within clutches. Canadian Journal of Zoology 93: 421-425.

Bowers, E.K., R.M Bowden, S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2015. Immune activation generates corticosterone-mediated terminal reproductive investment in a wild bird. American Naturalist 185: 769-783.

Bowers, E.K., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2015. Persistent sex-by-environment effects on offspring fitness and sex-ratio adjustment in a wild bird population. Journal of Animal Ecology 84: 473-486.


Barnett, C.A., T.N. Suzuki, S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2015. Mass-based condition measures and their relationship with fitness: in what condition is condition? Journal of Zoology 296: 1-5.

Sakaluk, S.K., A.J. Wilson, E.K. Bowers, L.S. Johnson, B.S. Masters, B.G.P. Johnson, L.A. Vogel, A.M. Forsman, and C.F. Thompson. 2014. Genetic and environmental variation in condition, cutaneous immunity, and haematocrit in house wrens
. BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 242.

Lothery, C.J., C.F. Thompson, M.L. Lawler, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2014. Food supplementation fails to reveal a trade-off between incubation and self-maintenance in female house wrens. PLoS ONE 9(9): e106260.

Bowers, E.K., D. Nietz, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2014. Parental provisioning in house wrens: effects of varying brood size and consequences for offspring. Behavioral Ecology 25: 1485-1493.

Bowers, E.K., C.J. Hodges, A.M. Forsman, L.A. Vogel, B.S. Masters, B.G.P. Johnson, L.S. Johnson, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2014. Neonatal body condition, immune responsiveness, and hematocrit predict longevity in a wild bird population. Ecology 95: 3027-3034.

Barnett, C.A., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2014. Aggressive displays by male house wrens are composed of multiple components that predict attack. Journal of Field Ornithology 85: 56-62.

Thompson, C.F., S.K. Sakaluk, B.S. Masters, B.G.P. Johnson, L.A. Vogel, A.M. Forsman, and L.S. Johnson. 2014. Condition-dependent sex difference in nestling house wren (Troglodytes aedon) response to phytohaemagglutinin injection. Canadian Journal of Zoology 92: 1-7.

Bowers, E.K., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2014. Offspring sex ratio varies with clutch size for female house wrens induced to lay supernumerary eggs. Behavioral Ecology 25: 165-171.

Thompson, C.F., and S.K. Sakaluk. 2013. Science or mammon? The choice should be easy. International Society of Behavioral Ecology Newsletter 25: 5.

Bowers, E.K., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2013. Sibling cooperation influences the age of nest-leaving in an altricial bird. American Naturalist 181: 775-786.(Featured in: www.dugdug.com)

Barnett, C.A., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2012. Aggressiveness, boldness and parental food provisioning in male house wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Ethology 118: 984-993.

Grana, S.C., S.K. Sakaluk, R.M. Bowden, M.A. Doellman, L.A. Vogel, and C.F. Thompson. 2012. Reproductive allocation in female house wrens is not influenced by experimentally altered male attractiveness. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 66: 1247-1258.

Bowers, E.K., R.A. Smith, C.J. Hodges, L.M. Zimmerman, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2012. Sex-biased terminal investment in offspring induced by maternal immune challenge in the house wren (Troglodytes aedon). Proceedings of the Royal Society, B 279: 2891-2898. (Featured in The Scientist and Physorg.com)

Bowers, E.K., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2012. Experimentally increased egg production constrains future reproduction of female house wrens. Animal Behaviour 83: 495-500.

Sutherland, J.L., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2012. No effect of carotenoid supplementation on PHA response or body condition of nestling house wrens. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 85: 21-28.

Clairardin, S.G., C.A. Barnett, S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F Thompson. 2011. Experimentally increased in ovo testosterone leads to increased plasma bactericidal activity and decreased cutaneous immune response in nestling house wrens. Journal of Experimental Biology 214: 2778-2782.

Bowers, E.K., S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2011. Adaptive sex allocation in relation to hatching synchrony and offspring quality in house wrens. American Naturalist 177: 617-629.

Barnett, C.A., S.G. Clairardin, C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2011. Turning a deaf ear: a test of the manipulating androgens hypothesis in house wrens. Animal Behaviour 81: 113-120.

Masters, B.S., L.S. Johnson, B.G.P. Johnson, J.L Brubaker, S.K. Sakaluk, and C.F. Thompson. 2011. Evidence for heterozygote instability in microsatellite loci in house wrens. Biology Letters 7: 127-130.

Lambrechts M.M., F. Adriaensen, D.R. Ardia, A.V. Artemyev, F. Atiénzar, J. Banbura, E. Barba, J-C Bouvier, J. Camprodon, C. B. Cooper, et al.  2010. The design of artificial nestboxes for the study of secondary hole-nesting birds: a review of methodological inconsistencies and potential biases. Acta Ornithologica 45: 1-26.

DeMory, M.L., C.F. Thompson, and S.K. Sakaluk. 2010. Male quality influences male provisioning in house wrens independent of attractiveness. Behavioral Ecology 21: 1156-1164.

Forsman, A.M., S.K. Sakaluk, C.F. Thompson, and L.A. Vogel. 2010. Cutaneous immune activity, but not innate immune responsiveness, covaries with mass and environment in nestling house wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 83: 512-518.

Johnson, L.S., C.F. Thompson, S.K. Sakaluk, M. Neuhäuser, B.G.P. Johnson, S.S. Soukup, S.J. Forsythe, and B.S. Masters. 2009. Extra-pair young in house wren broods are more likely to be male than female. Proceedings of the Royal Society, B  276: 2285-2289.

Forsman, A.M., L.A. Vogel, S.K. Sakaluk, B.G. Johnson , B.S. Masters, L.S. Johnson, and C. F. Thompson. 2008. Female house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) increase the size, but not immunocompetence, of their offspring through extra-pair mating. Molecular Ecology 17: 3697-3706.

Forsman, A.M, L.A. Vogel, S.K. Sakaluk, J.L. Grindstaff, and C.F. Thompson. 2008. Immune-challenged house wren broods differ in the relative strengths of their responses among different axes of the immune system. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 21: 873-878.

Robinson, W.D., J.D. Strysky, B.J. Payne, R.G. Harper, and C.F. Thompson. 2008. Why are incubation periods longer in the tropics? A common-garden experiment with house wrens reveals it is all in the egg. American Naturalist 171: 532-535.

Dobbs, R.C., J.D. Styrsky, and C.F. Thompson. 2006. Clutch size and the costs of incubation in the house wren. Behavioral Ecology 17: 849-856.

Eckerle, K.P., and C.F. Thompson. 2006. Mate choice in house wrens: nest cavities trump male characteristics. Behaviour 143: 253-271.

Eckerle, K.P, and C.F. Thompson. 2005. Addition of arthropod cocoons to house wren nests is correlated with delayed pairing. Behavioral Ecology 16: 1-7.

Janota, S.M., S.S. Soukup, and C.F. Thompson. 2002. Male-biased offspring sex ratio in the house wren. Condor 104: 881-885.

Styrsky, J.D., R.C. Dobbs, and C.F. Thompson. 2002. Sources of egg-size variation in house wrens: ontogenetic and environmental components. Auk 119: 800-807.

Ellis, L.A., J.D. Styrsky, R.C. Dobbs, and C.F. Thompson. 2001. Female condition: a predictor of hatching synchrony in the house wren? Condor 103: 587-591.

Eckerle, K.P., and C.F. Thompson. 2001. Yellow-breasted chat Icteria virens. in The Birds of North America, No. 575 (A. Poole and F. Gill, eds.). The Birds of North America, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Ellis, L.A., D.W. Borst, and C.F. Thompson. 2001. Hatching asynchrony and maternal androgens in egg yolks of house wrens. Journal of Avian Biology 32: 26-30.

Styrsky, J.D., R.C. Dobbs, and C.F. Thompson. 2000. Food-supplementation does not override the effect of egg mass on fitness-related traits of nestling house wrens. Journal of Animal Ecology 69: 690-702.

Styrsky, J.D., K.P. Eckerle, and C.F. Thompson. 1999. Fitness-related consequences of egg mass in nestling house wrens. Proceedings of the Royal Society, London, B 266: 1253-1258.

Pacejka, A.J., C.M. Gratton, and C.F. Thompson. 1998. Do potentially virulent mites affect house wren Troglodytes aedon reproductive success? Ecology 79: 1797-1806.

Soukup, S.S., and C.F. Thompson. 1998. Social mating system and reproductive success in house wrens. Behavioral Ecology 9: 43-48.

Soukup, S.S., and C.F. Thompson. 1997. Social mating system affects the frequency of extra-pair paternity in house wrens. Animal Behaviour 54: 1089-1105.

Cavitt, J.F., and C.F. Thompson. 1997. Mass loss in breeding house wrens: effects of food supplements. Ecology 78: 2512-2523.

Thompson, C.F., G.F. Ray, and R.L. Preston. 1996. Nectar-robbing in blue tits Parus caeruleus: failure of a novel feeding trait to spread. Ibis 138: 552-553.

Pacejka, A.J., and C.F. Thompson. 1996. Does removal of old nests from nestboxes by researchers affect mite populations in subsequent nests of house wrens? Journal of Field Ornithology 67: 558-564.

Pacejka, A.J., E. Santana, R.G. Harper, and C.F. Thompson. 1996. House wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and nest-dwelling ectoparasites: mite population growth and feeding patterns. Journal of Avian Biology 27: 273-278.

 

 

Journal of Zoology Cover

Will et al. 2017. Journal of Zoology 302(1): 1-7

Cover photograph by Dylan Poorboy

 

Journal of Experimental Zoology Cover

Strange et al. 2016. 325A(6): 347-359

Cover photograph by Paulo E. Llambias

 

Molecular Ecology Cover

Forsman et al. 2008. Molecular Ecology 17(16): 3697-3706

Cover photograph montage by Shawn Billo

Female house wren taking a mealworm provided as a food supplement during the egg-laying period

 

 

Male hands food for nestlings to brooding female

Photo by E. Keith Bowers, 2013 video

 


Eyes bigger than its stomach?
Photo by Meghan Strange, 2014

Setting up Northgate experiment, April 2014
Meghan Strange and Erin Dorset
Photo by Charles F. Thompson

2014 Nestbox construction
E. Keith Bowers and Christine J. Hodges
Photo by Charles F. Thompson


Perceived-predation-risk experiment 2014
Erin Dorset with altered nestbox and digital camera
Photo by Charles F. Thompson

Bluebells
Mackinaw Study Area, Old ParkLands, 2015
Photo by Charles F. Thompson

Nest Box

Nestbox
Mackinaw Study Area, 2005
Photo by Scott K. Sakaluk

House wren nestling on brood-day 11
Mackinaw Study Area, 2009
Photo by E. Keith Bowers

House wren nestling on brood-day 1

Mackinaw Study Area, 2010
Photo by Cassie Lothery

House wren clutch with supernumerary eggs

Mackinaw Study Area, 2012
Photo by Christine J. Hodges

House wren egg yolk biopsy

Lisa Ellis, East Bay Study Area, 1998
Photo by H. Tak Cheung

2007 Wren Crew party cake

baked by Sandrine Clairardin
Photo by Charles F. Thompson

Preparing egg for testosterone injection

East Bay Study Area, 2008
Photo by Charles F. Thompson

Nestbox construction, 1982

Administering a dietary supplement to a nestling
Meghan Strange, Mackinaw Study Area, 2013
Photo by Charles F. Thompson


House wren nestling caught in the act of hatching
Mackinaw Study Area, 2013
Photo by Christine J. Hodges